Everything Will be Alright

It was just over four years ago when our son made his decision to attend Indiana University, a large public research institution in the charming mid-western college town of Bloomington. And it was five years ago during our student tour, that I remember standing at the entrance to the oldest part of the campus from our place under the graceful limestone arches known as the Sample Gates. A few years later we gathered for parents weekend and cheered on the football team, met roommates and friends, and celebrated university life. Time marched on, the distance between the school and our home is several hours, young men aren’t in need of their parents as often, and the visits to the Bloomington campus ceased, until a few weeks ago. With graduation looming, I heard the call of this beautiful mid-western university and felt an instinctive pull toward our son to spend a last visit together, cement graduation plans and to dream of the future. I met housemates and friends, celebrated university life and embraced the instinctive moment of motherhood when I knew that everything would be, alright. Before I drove back to the airport, I stood again at the Sample Gates and imagined a young man from Atlanta, Georgia tossing his graduation cap from the sunroof of his car as he turned left at the limestone gates for the last time, driving towards a friendly fading sun who lightly whispered a future of love, laughter, hope and promise.

73 comments

    • The first year is the most difficult for a parent, but slowly you begin to reap parenting rewards. It’s a bittersweet thing, watching the child you adore evolve from a boy to a man. Have a great week, Laura!

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    • I teared up a few times myself through the whole process, Sue. We know how precious time is with our children…it hits hard sometimes, doesn’t it? See you soon, I hope!

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  • They go, they return…and in that time between, they change from being your child to being your grown-up child. For they will always be, your child. But how they grow up…and isn’t it fabulous, though sometimes scary, to watch them take those early steps into adulthood! We just hope they don’t make the same mistakes that we did. I hope you all enjoy the graduation. 🙂 🙂

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    • I couldn’t have said it better, and after I read your comment I wish I had! Very insightful stuff, and yes, I don’t want them to make them the same mistakes I did and try not to preach about it. But I guess a misstep here or there makes us who we are. Take care, and thanks for stopping by!

      Liked by 1 person

  • Hundreds of times I have watched it on a movie or TV series – reading your beautiful text reminded me of how much of our life changes with such separation – and more how differently parents and children cope with it!

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    • Watching our children turn into adults is bittersweet, but you know you’ve done your job when they’ve become independent and move on, but still want to be a part of your world. Thanks for another wonderful comment. Take care,
      Elisa

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  • A lovely post, Elisa. Congrats to you and to your son, on a job well. done, and I wish him every success in his chosen career. Those gates are really something, aren’t they? 🙂

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  • A beautiful photo that echoes your sentiments Elisa. Watching your child prepare to cross the threshold into adulthood is bittersweet indeed. Congratulations to you both! 🙂

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    • Thank you, Madhu. I’m not a terribly sentimental person until one of our children reaches a pivotal milestone toward adulthood. This is one of them! 🙂

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  • Sweet post, Elisa. My baby is in her junior year–it flies by so quickly. You have captured the sweet and the bittersweet of it all in both your photo and your words.

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  • Elisa, these passages of time and place are milestones that are the signposts of our human condition: the metamorphosis of our children and their children. Wonderful memories “cemented” in the playground of the mind.

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  • Hi Elisa – I’m not ready for my three young women to leave the nest. Their moms aren’t ready either. More so Laurie after last week. The time will come eventually. But, until then, we’re keeping our girls close. 🙂

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    • Julie, thank you! These are transitional times in our household. And I think you’re right, this midwestern town does have a bit of an international feel. Thanks for stopping by!

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  • I forgot him!! Oh, Dear!! I think of the girls as The Girls, but I simply forgot about him. Good grief! He’s graduating. I doubt you’re through financing him, but he’s done so well, Elisa. Independent young man. The photograph is beautiful. What the heck are you processing with? This ain’t straight outta’ da camera! Chuckle… Beautiful and storybook illustration classic. Hmmm. Mama, you ain’t old enough… Just not old enough for that kid to be out and about on his own!! Hang on. He’ll come home with at least a partner of sorts one of these days… Chuckle…

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    • Yes, our son is a bit more private so I’ve always respected that, especially when blogging. But I wanted a special post to celebrate his journey, and was trying to create a photograph to capture the wonder. But I couldn’t get it right! No matter how I changed the settings it looked flat and lifeless, and people kept walking into my shot…not their fault of course. So yes, I used a photo effect to jazz it up. I know some people don’t care for the photo tinkering, but I thought this one helped convey my mood a little bit. Future is bright and all that. 🙂
      Good to see you “out and about” I’ll be over to check in on you!

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    • Funny! There was a journalism student whose assignment was to interview people who were out and about because the weather was so nice, i.e., above 32 degrees – balmy by Indiana standards. If there’s symmetry, it’s due to my planting myself in one spot and pretending to be a statue so she’d stop practicing interview tactics on me. Every picture tells story, right?

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    • Thank you, Michael. Yes, proud, happy, excited and a little sad that it’s his time to hop on the treadmill. My fingers are crossed that he finds a career that doesn’t necessarily feel like work. I’m glad you stopped by…take care!

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  • Nothing is as lovely for any parent as knowing that everything will be alright with the offspring. I can feel your excitement between the words. And what a lovely photograph. Looks like a very nice campus.

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    • Otto, thank you. It’s rewarding (and somewhat of a relief) when people are able to feel my words as they come together on the page. I’m glad you stopped by…take care,
      Elisa

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  • Indeed it will! (We did the same to our parents didn’t we?)
    🙂
    Congratulations to y’all. And they do come back.
    I can relate perfectly: Daughter # 2 is finishing a Master’s at George Washington University. Luckily he boyfriend is here, so she will come back in May. 🙂
    And Doctor Daughter #1 and her Doctor husband are in London for Masters in tropical diseases. ETA September. But we’ll visit them in London in July.
    🙂
    Y’all take care naw!
    Brian
    PS. And many thanks for your visits. I’ve been a bit disconnected from the blogosphere tending urgent matters but those are almost taken care off. The frog is back!
    🙂

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  • Oh, I truly hope so, Elisa! In these days of doom and gloom it’s wonderful to have something to celebrate. Mick is a little too addicted to the TV news, which is one reason I so enjoy our Algarve escapes. I love your ‘jazzing up’, as George puts it (nice to see her still going strong and to catch these little snippets of conversation). I would have not a clue how, but it’s beautiful. 🙂
    Here’s to many joyful occasions for you and your family!

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    • Hi Jo! Yes, gloomy and getting gloomier every day it seems…I think you’re on the right track by avoiding the TV news, which is difficult in these days of 24-hour reporting. Glad you like the shot! The effect was from an iPhone app that I use. It’s very easy, or I wouldn’t attempt!! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  • I just sent off my second grader for a field trip to the farm this rain drenched spring morning. And just right at the back of my mind I had been wondering if he’ll do alright trudging for miles in the muddy countryside. (Finnish children go outside in all weathers with only a grudging exception when it’s -25 C!) And then this thought came to me that everything will be alright. What a big moment for you Elisa! What a blessed, beautiful place to be. Warmest congratulations! Hugs, Sharon

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