Ice Ice Baby

ERP_6802

The ice plant is a drought tolerant, bunny resistant plant whose flowers close at night, open in the morning and slowly follow the path of the sun until nightfall. Its name is a curiosity and I can’t walk by this low-growing patch of bright pink flowers without thinking of the one hit wonder by Vanilla Ice,  Ice  Ice Baby. It’s funny how the mind works…..everything in my world is reminiscent of  a song. The ice plant is native to South Africa and is naturalized to many warm climate regions across the globe. It is a succulent, meaning it’s a plant that stores water in its leaves and stems so that they can tolerate dry conditions. It’s known by a variety of descriptive names, including “highway ice plant,” “pigface” (I don’t get that one) and “sour pig plant,” because of its edible fruit. The fact it has small, clear engorged hairs on the surface of the leaves that look like frozen droplets of water makes the most sense to me for the name. The ice plant is what I call, a keeper.

Even though Rolling Stone Magazine listed it as the fourth worst song of the 90’s in a reader’s poll, I still crank up the volume when this hip hop song comes on the radio.

49 Comments

    1. You are the best! The writing seems to flow better after a good Pinot Noir, and the photographs are a lot about luck! But I love every minute of it.

      I hope you are well, and sidestepping all wildlife with giant teeth!!

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      1. Yes, sometimes it does, me too, take a little ‘nudge’ from whatever to get words to flow. But just so you know, I grade papers for a living, and in my humble opinion not only are your sentiments finely attuned to your surroundings, but you communicate those feelings and observations so very effectively. I am sure I am not the only one who really looks forward to your blogs. 🙂

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  1. Truly beautiful image, love your photography and writing that goes along with it. So do I understand that a “good Pinot Noir” is the key?! lol ~

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  2. Very pretty and I always appreciate learning something new especially when it comes to flowers! And, I’ll have “ice, ice baby” in my head the rest of the day! 😉

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    1. Ha, I just enjoyed reading your comment, and I’m sorry to say its been a few days and I still have that darned song in my head. I’d better come up with a new post or I’ll crazy!

      Take care,
      Elisa

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    1. Thank you! Evidently the ice plant is called pig face in Australia, but no one seems to know why! I went outside and studied them for a while, but I saw no resemblance….maybe pigs eat them!

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    1. It’s funny, after I first read your comment I went outside to grab a look. They’re so tiny, especially the stamen, that it’s hard to imagine them as anything, but I’m sure there’s any interesting story behind the name!

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  3. Notre Dame Nature sans faire mystères , auprès de fleurs brise la glace ,
    Laissant s’éclore à la surface , bien des couleurs nées sous lumière ,
    Hors d’aventures ces filles de l’air , poussent hors les murs un brin fugace ,
    Histoire de nous laisser cent traces , d’une alchimie loin des chimères 😉
    ~
    NéO~
    ~
    Becs hors frontières

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  4. Lovely photo, Elisa. Our gardener has just planted hundreds of these in the retaining wall at the front of our house. They’ll look marvellous when they grow a bit and start flowering. 🙂

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    1. Thanks for the link…how could you not like a wine that smells like PEZ?! I’m going to give it a try.
      Cheers, hope you’re having a wonderful summer with your family!
      Elisa

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  5. Hi there,
    I’ve just nominated your blog for the Super Sweet Award. Hope you like getting awards and are able to accept it. Many happy blogging days ahead!
    brissiemaz

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    1. Thank you very much for honoring me with the super-sweet award, being recognized like this is especially sweet! You made my day when I saw your notes!
      Have a wonderful Monday!
      Elisa

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  6. Beautiful photo. The native plant people don’t like Ice plant because it takes over. I saw a lot of it when I lived on the coast in Northern California. Did you know that the juice of the succulent leaves (at least the variety near us) stains clothing? For years I could never figure out were the brown stains on my kids socks were coming from. This sounds awful but unbeknownst to us they were sliding down hills covered with ice plant on cardboard boxes for fun…hence the stains which did not show up until the socks…or white T-shirts were washed. Making the mystery even deeper. Don’t ask me how we figured it out eventually.

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    1. Thank you for sharing your memory. I’ll never look at my patch of ice plant without thinking of your children happily winging it down a flower covered hill. I think I would I have joined in for a ride, had I seen them. Sorry about the stains, when they come home all dirty you know they’ve been having a good time!
      Take care,
      Elisa

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