The Scarlett O’Hara of Doors


A door like no other. I passed this hinged wonder tucked away on a side street in downtown Atlanta and was so intrigued I returned the following week to take a second look. I don’t know the inspiration behind the design, but oddly it reminded me of another southern belle, the Gone With the Wind heroine, Scarlett O’Hara. Β She also possessed a fierce iron will disguised beneath an ornately beautiful exterior. Β Do you see the resemblance?

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50 comments

    • Fiddle dee dee, Robin, you just made my night! Seriously though, I am grateful for the support, since I was afraid everyone was going to think I was off my rocker for comparing Scarlett O’Hara to a door. How on earth are you? I miss hearing from you and reading your wonderful post from Bringing Europe Home. I hope you are well!
      Fondly,
      Elisa

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      • Not off your rocker–just very clever! I appreciate your kind words, Elisa. I’m doing well–working on other writing. I’m being published in some local newspapers and magazines…one day I might manage a new post on my blog, but we’ll see. Thanks for asking!

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  • What a clever post Elisa! Gone with the Wind… I helped it gross its enormous profits! I saw the film eleven times, and must have read the book as often!!!
    I read that wonderful Hattie McDaniels was asked not to attend the opening of the film in at Atlanta, and when she went to the Oscars to receive the award for Best Supporting Actress, she had to sit alone in a segregated area… times have certainly changed… she was the daughter of former slaves, which brings history very near, doesn’t it….
    I had to read Bruce Catton, and other historians to get a true picture of the Civil War after all this Gone with the Winding… someone once called it the South’s final victory!

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    • Thank you Valerie, and yes, Gone With the Wind will always be in my top spot for favorite movie (edging out Philadelphia Story) and favorite novel (edging out many!) I, too, am inspired by Hattie McDaniel. You are right, in my research for this post, I read that she, along with the other black actors, were barred from attending the Atlanta premier. Clark Gable was so angry that he threatened to boycott unless McDaniel was allowed to attend, but McDaniel convinced him to go anyway. I saw that she graciously decided not to attend the premier to avoid controversy. I have been so touched by her story that I would love to write a post about her someday. So glad you read and enjoyed, Valerie! Take care.
      Elisa

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  • Only you could see Scarlet in that door! Well, now that you mention it, I see it, too! πŸ˜€
    I love that movie!! I could SO see it again!
    Have a great week, Elisa!

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    • Leave it to me Jeannie. Leave it to me! And yes, I LOVED that movie and the novel was spellbinding. I need to make sure my daughter sees the movie…the ultimate romance and I am woman hear me roar, movie!

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  • Loved the movie. The book was the first novel I read. Great post! We have come a long way from being banned from certain areas. Praise the Lord!

    BE ENCOURAGED! BE BLESSED!

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  • My husband was born and raised in Grant Park, and he didn’t see Gone With the Wind until after we were married! Tragic!

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    • It’s rare to meet a true native of Atlanta these days, it must be interesting to be married to one. I imagine he’s been stunned by the city’s growth over the years. I wonder what he thought of the movie?

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      • Shamefully, IMO, he found it ‘boring’. I was just truly shocked he’d never seen it – I watched it in eight grade as part of a school assignment!

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        • Interestingly, I read that Clark Gable found it to be his least favorite movie, because he found it to be a “ladies movie.” So your husband is in good company!

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    • My 18 year old daughter has finally committed to watching it with me for the first time. I can’t wait! If she doesn’t like it I’ll be crestfallen, I think..

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    • Sue! I am so glad you enjoyed my Scarlett O’hara post. With the two of you being Irish girls, and with St. Patrick’s Day right around the corner, I can see where you made the connection! πŸ™‚
      I don’t go downtown that often, but when I do….I stay for a while. Usually after an airport run! I hope to see you this Sunday for at least one Guinness…
      Elisa

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  • That’s a mighty impressive door.

    Now, I can’t imagine Scarlett being called “Pansy” or Tara being called “Fountenoy Hall”. Good thing Margaret Mitchell changed it. πŸ™‚

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  • Those are beautiful!!! I think Scarlett was a very mean kind of person but so beautiful to look at. I wish I had a grand estate.

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    • Thank you, Jasmine. Scarlett was as mean as a snake, but she was a survivor, so I think that counts for something! And so beautiful. In real life it turns out she had bi-polar disorder and died of tuberculosis at the age of 53, which is SUCH a downer. I was so sad to read that.

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    • Madhu, I’m looking forward to watching it again with my daughter. I haven’t seen it in (many) years, I hope I’m not disappointed!

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  • Oh, like, like, like, LIKE!! *woot* πŸ˜€

    What a stunning door and amazing photograph. I love the creativity of linking these two Southern Belles together, and you did flawlessly!

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  • Great picture with really nice description. Thanks for showing a glimpse of this door to us. πŸ™‚ Have a great day!!

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  • I think you got the door nailed. Wonderful description, “the Scarlet O’Hara of doors”. You’re just too clever, Elisa. Atlanta was burned nearly to the ground, wasn’t it? If I recall correctly, the battle for Atlanta was the death knell for the Confederacy. After it was taken by the fierce Hood, the armies spread out through Georgia and the rest of the Confederate South. It was such a bloody and awful time. I just read “The Hogs of Cold Harbor”. The suffering on both sides was horrendous. GWTW continues to inform our concept of the genteel South. I suppose we prefer this view. πŸ™‚ You presented it well here. You are a highly skilled story teller, you know. I enjoyed this post very much.

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